Monday, 11/12/2017 | 6:13 UTC+0
Libyan Newswire
  • Gemalto eSIM technology enables Always Connected experience for new Microsoft Surface Pro with LTE Advanced

    Advanced integration of eSIM into Windows 10 delivers an enhanced user experience  Amsterdam, December 7,   2017 – Gemalto, the world leader in digital security, is supplying the eSIM (embedded SIM) solution for Microsoft’s Surface Pro with LTE Advanced, the most connected laptop in its class1 which will begin shipping to business customers in December 2017. […]

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  • الإمارات العربية المتحدة هي أول بلد عربي يفوز بعضوية مجلس المنظمة البحرية الدولية من الفئة ب

    دبي، الإمارات العربية المتحدة، 6 ديسمبر 2017/PRNewswire/ — أصبحت الإمارات العربية المتحدة الآن البلد العربي الأول الذي يفوز بعضوية مجلس المنظمة البحرية الدولية (IMO) من الفئة ب. وكان هذا الانتصار نتيجة الفوز بانتخاب تضمن مرشحين من 11 بلد رائد في قطاع التجارة البحرية الدولية مثل ألمانيا والسويد وهولندا والبرازيل والأرجنتين وفرنسا وأستراليا. هذا وتم إعلان […]

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  • MediaTek SoCs are optimized and ready for Android Oreo (Go edition)

    Google and MediaTek collaborate to deliver improved performance in entry-level smartphones HSINCHU, Taiwan, Dec. 7, 2017 /PRNewswire/ — MediaTek Inc. today announced that it is a System-on-Chip (SoC) partner for providing Google’s Android™ Oreo (Go edition) software to smartphone makers, and after a deep collaboration with Google, MediaTek’s MT6739, MT6737, and MT6580 SoCs, among others, […]

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  • The Manchester bombing: unknown unknowns and “hindsight bias”

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    TerrorismThe Manchester bombing: unknown unknowns and “hindsight bias”

    By Dan Lomas

    Published 6 December 2017

    The May 2017 Manchester Arena bombing could have been prevented, a report by the former Independent Reviewer of Terrorism Legislation has revealed.David Anderson QC’s report suggests there were opportunities to reopen the case, raising the possibility the attack could have been stopped. Newspaper headlines, however, are misleading, neglecting the nuance in Anderson’s report that the decision to ignore or misinterpret the intelligence on Abedi was “understandable” in the circumstances, overlooking the complex nature of counter-terror investigations. So, could the Manchester bombing really have been prevented?

    The May 2017 Manchester Arena bombing could have been prevented, a report by the former Independent Reviewer of Terrorism Legislation has revealed. The 22-year-old attacker Salman Abedi, who killed 22 people and injured 512 others, had been a “subject of interest” to Britain’s Security Service (MI5) in 2014 and 2015 but was classed as a “low residual risk” to national security and his case was closed.

    David Anderson QC’s report suggests there were opportunities to reopen the case, raising the possibility the attack could have been stopped. MI5 twice received intelligence reports which – had their significance been “properly understood” – would have reopened the investigation into Abedi. The intelligence was not “fully appreciated” and judged to “relate not to terrorism” but possible “nefarious activity or criminality”. Abedi was just one of a number of closed subjects of interest (SOI) whose case needed “further consideration”. A meeting to review the evidence was scheduled for 31 May 2017 – nine days after the Manchester Arena bombing.

    MI5 had also missed the opportunity to place a port alert on Abedi following a visit to Libya in April 2017. Had they done so, Abedi could have been questioned and searched by counter-terror police four days before the attack. As with the Westminster Bridge attacker, 52-year-old Khalid Masood, Abedi was judged to pose little threat, yet struck with devastating results.

    The findings form part of a review requested by Home Secretary Amber Rudd to provide “independent assurance” of internal reviews by the police and MI5, to assess intelligence and decisions before the attacks, and to “identify whether the processes and systems … can be improved”.

    Greater Manchester Mayor Andy Burnham said Anderson’s report would be a “difficult read” for Mancunians, adding: “It is clear that things could, and perhaps should, have been done differently and that wrong judgements have been made.”

    The report led to a series of headlines suggesting MI5 had been caught napping. BBC News claimed the attack “could have been stopped,” The Financial Times ran with the story that Abedi could have been “prevented”, while The Daily Mail suggested MI5 had missed a series of red lines and were “alerted months” before the Manchester Arena blast. One commentator concluded that Anderson’s conclusions are “damning for MI5.” The implication being a so-called “intelligence failure” had occurred.

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  • The Manchester bombing: unknown unknowns and “hindsight bias”

    view counter

    TerrorismThe Manchester bombing: unknown unknowns and “hindsight bias”

    By Dan Lomas

    Published 6 December 2017

    The May 2017 Manchester Arena bombing could have been prevented, a report by the former Independent Reviewer of Terrorism Legislation has revealed.David Anderson QC’s report suggests there were opportunities to reopen the case, raising the possibility the attack could have been stopped. Newspaper headlines, however, are misleading, neglecting the nuance in Anderson’s report that the decision to ignore or misinterpret the intelligence on Abedi was “understandable” in the circumstances, overlooking the complex nature of counter-terror investigations. So, could the Manchester bombing really have been prevented?

    The May 2017 Manchester Arena bombing could have been prevented, a report by the former Independent Reviewer of Terrorism Legislation has revealed. The 22-year-old attacker Salman Abedi, who killed 22 people and injured 512 others, had been a “subject of interest” to Britain’s Security Service (MI5) in 2014 and 2015 but was classed as a “low residual risk” to national security and his case was closed.

    David Anderson QC’s report suggests there were opportunities to reopen the case, raising the possibility the attack could have been stopped. MI5 twice received intelligence reports which – had their significance been “properly understood” – would have reopened the investigation into Abedi. The intelligence was not “fully appreciated” and judged to “relate not to terrorism” but possible “nefarious activity or criminality”. Abedi was just one of a number of closed subjects of interest (SOI) whose case needed “further consideration”. A meeting to review the evidence was scheduled for 31 May 2017 – nine days after the Manchester Arena bombing.

    MI5 had also missed the opportunity to place a port alert on Abedi following a visit to Libya in April 2017. Had they done so, Abedi could have been questioned and searched by counter-terror police four days before the attack. As with the Westminster Bridge attacker, 52-year-old Khalid Masood, Abedi was judged to pose little threat, yet struck with devastating results.

    The findings form part of a review requested by Home Secretary Amber Rudd to provide “independent assurance” of internal reviews by the police and MI5, to assess intelligence and decisions before the attacks, and to “identify whether the processes and systems … can be improved”.

    Greater Manchester Mayor Andy Burnham said Anderson’s report would be a “difficult read” for Mancunians, adding: “It is clear that things could, and perhaps should, have been done differently and that wrong judgements have been made.”

    The report led to a series of headlines suggesting MI5 had been caught napping. BBC News claimed the attack “could have been stopped,” The Financial Times ran with the story that Abedi could have been “prevented”, while The Daily Mail suggested MI5 had missed a series of red lines and were “alerted months” before the Manchester Arena blast. One commentator concluded that Anderson’s conclusions are “damning for MI5.” The implication being a so-called “intelligence failure” had occurred.

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  • New Analysis: 1 in 12 Children Face “Bleaker Prospects” Than Their Parents. Here’s Why

    By: Joanne Lu on December 06, 2017

    The future doesn’t look so bright for 180 million children.

    Despite major improvements in child well-being around the world over the last 20 years, a recent UNICEF analysis found that children in 37 countries face “bleaker prospects” than their parents in escaping poverty, getting a basic education and avoiding violent death.

    “While the last generation has seen vast, unprecedented gains in living standards for most of the world’s children, the fact that a forgotten minority of children have been excluded from this – through no fault of their own or those of their families – is a travesty,” Laurence Chandy, UNICEF director of data, research and policy, said in a press release.

    In 2015, the UN celebrated the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) – the predecessor to the current Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) – as the “most successful anti-poverty movement in history.” A 15-year collaborative push by nations and international organizations lifted more than one billion people out of extreme poverty, almost halved the proportion of people suffering from hunger and enrolled more children in primary school than ever before.

    “Yet for all the remarkable gains, I am keenly aware that inequalities persist and that progress has been uneven,” then-UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon wrote in the UN’s final report of the MDGs.

    In 14 countries, the share of people living in extreme poverty (on less than $1.90 a day) has increased, mostly as a result of unrest, conflict or poor governance. Major conflicts in CAR, Iraq, Libya, South Sudan, Syria, Ukraine and Yemen have also caused an increase in violent deaths among children under 19. Meanwhile, financial crises, rapid population growth and conflicts have led to decreased primary school enrollment in 21 countries.

    At least one of the three key indicators – escaping poverty, getting a basic education and avoiding violent death – were found to be declining in: Benin, Bolivia, Cameroon, Central African Republic (CAR), Comoros, Côte d’Ivoire, Djibouti, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Guatemala, Guyana, Guinea-Bissau, Jordan, Iraq, Kiribati, Lebanon, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Mali, Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Palau, Paraguay, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Solomon Islands, South Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Tonga, United Republic of Tanzania, Ukraine, Vanuatu, Yemen, Zambia and Zimbabwe.

    Three of the 37 countries – CAR, Syria and Yemen – saw a decline in two of the indicators, but South Sudan was the only country in which prospects for children were found to be declining in all three aspects.

    The thing is, children are keenly aware of what issues are making the greatest impact on their well-being and futures.

    In a separate UNICEF study, 9- to 18-year olds in all of the 14 countries surveyed identified poverty, poor education and terrorism as the foremost issues they wanted global leaders to work on. Also across all 14 countries, violence against children were the respondents’ greatest worry, with 67 percent saying they worried “a lot.”

    Sadly, nearly half of the children surveyed are not optimistic that adults and world leaders will make good decisions for children.

    “In a time of rapid technological change leading to huge gains in living standards, it is perverse that hundreds of millions are seeing living standards actually decline, creating a sense of injustice among them and failure among those entrusted with their care,” Chandy said. “No wonder they feel their voices are unheard and their futures uncertain.”

    There was leeway for uneven progress in many of the MDG targets, but the SDGs put forth ambitious goals for 2030, like “end poverty in all its forms everywhere,” “ensure inclusive and quality education for all” and “end abuse, exploitation, trafficking and all forms of violence against children.”

    As the global community tries to accelerate progress toward the SDGs, this latest report shows there is no room to leave anyone behind – especially children, who either will be the beneficiaries of a sustainable future, or will have to pick up the pieces.

    Discussion

    comments…

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  • New Analysis: 1 in 12 Children Face “Bleaker Prospects” Than Their Parents. Here’s Why

    By: Joanne Lu on December 06, 2017

    The future doesn’t look so bright for 180 million children.

    Despite major improvements in child well-being around the world over the last 20 years, a recent UNICEF analysis found that children in 37 countries face “bleaker prospects” than their parents in escaping poverty, getting a basic education and avoiding violent death.

    “While the last generation has seen vast, unprecedented gains in living standards for most of the world’s children, the fact that a forgotten minority of children have been excluded from this – through no fault of their own or those of their families – is a travesty,” Laurence Chandy, UNICEF director of data, research and policy, said in a press release.

    In 2015, the UN celebrated the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) – the predecessor to the current Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) – as the “most successful anti-poverty movement in history.” A 15-year collaborative push by nations and international organizations lifted more than one billion people out of extreme poverty, almost halved the proportion of people suffering from hunger and enrolled more children in primary school than ever before.

    “Yet for all the remarkable gains, I am keenly aware that inequalities persist and that progress has been uneven,” then-UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon wrote in the UN’s final report of the MDGs.

    In 14 countries, the share of people living in extreme poverty (on less than $1.90 a day) has increased, mostly as a result of unrest, conflict or poor governance. Major conflicts in CAR, Iraq, Libya, South Sudan, Syria, Ukraine and Yemen have also caused an increase in violent deaths among children under 19. Meanwhile, financial crises, rapid population growth and conflicts have led to decreased primary school enrollment in 21 countries.

    At least one of the three key indicators – escaping poverty, getting a basic education and avoiding violent death – were found to be declining in: Benin, Bolivia, Cameroon, Central African Republic (CAR), Comoros, Côte d’Ivoire, Djibouti, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Guatemala, Guyana, Guinea-Bissau, Jordan, Iraq, Kiribati, Lebanon, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Mali, Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Palau, Paraguay, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Solomon Islands, South Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Tonga, United Republic of Tanzania, Ukraine, Vanuatu, Yemen, Zambia and Zimbabwe.

    Three of the 37 countries – CAR, Syria and Yemen – saw a decline in two of the indicators, but South Sudan was the only country in which prospects for children were found to be declining in all three aspects.

    The thing is, children are keenly aware of what issues are making the greatest impact on their well-being and futures.

    In a separate UNICEF study, 9- to 18-year olds in all of the 14 countries surveyed identified poverty, poor education and terrorism as the foremost issues they wanted global leaders to work on. Also across all 14 countries, violence against children were the respondents’ greatest worry, with 67 percent saying they worried “a lot.”

    Sadly, nearly half of the children surveyed are not optimistic that adults and world leaders will make good decisions for children.

    “In a time of rapid technological change leading to huge gains in living standards, it is perverse that hundreds of millions are seeing living standards actually decline, creating a sense of injustice among them and failure among those entrusted with their care,” Chandy said. “No wonder they feel their voices are unheard and their futures uncertain.”

    There was leeway for uneven progress in many of the MDG targets, but the SDGs put forth ambitious goals for 2030, like “end poverty in all its forms everywhere,” “ensure inclusive and quality education for all” and “end abuse, exploitation, trafficking and all forms of violence against children.”

    As the global community tries to accelerate progress toward the SDGs, this latest report shows there is no room to leave anyone behind – especially children, who either will be the beneficiaries of a sustainable future, or will have to pick up the pieces.

    Discussion

    comments…

    Read more

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