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Libyan Newswire

UNHCR / GLOBAL TRENDS REPORT

STORY: UNHCR / GLOBAL TRENDS REPORT
TRT: 3:48
SOURCE: UNHCR
RESTRICTIONS: PLEASE CREDIT UNHCR ON SCREEN
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH /NATS

DATELINE: 13 JUNE 2018, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND /FILE

SHOTLIST:

13 JUNE 2018, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

1. Pan left, Grandi going to podium
2. Med shot, Grandi and spokesperson at the podium
3. Wide shot, press room
4. SOUNDBITE (English) Filippo Grandi, UN High Commissioner for Refugees:
5. “We are now at 68.5 million people displaced or refugees globally. Needless to say, this is because of protracted conflicts, lack of solutions for those conflicts that continue, continuous pressure on civilians in countries of conflict that push them to leave their homes, and new or aggravating crises as well, like the Rohingya crisis, that of course accounts for quite a big increase in the number of refugees.”
6. Cutaway, reporters
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Filippo Grandi, UN High Commissioner for Refugees:
“We observed that 85 percent of that 68.5 million is in poor or middle-income countries. That is a very significant element, I think, because it should be an element dispelling the perception, the notion that is so prevailing in many countries that the refugee crisis, singular, is a crisis of the rich world. It is not. It continues to be a crisis mostly of the poor world.”
8. Cutaway, reporters
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Filippo Grandi, UN High Commissioner for Refugees:
“Seventy percent of these people come, are nationals of ten counties alone, out of the 193 countries of the world. That is significant because it means, frankly that if there were solutions to conflict fundamentally in those countries, or in some of them at least, that huge figure instead of rising every year could start going down. But we haven’t seen any significant progress in peace making or peacebuilding in any of those ten countries producing 70 percent of the global force displacement.”
10. Wide shot, press room
11. SOUNDBITE (English) Filippo Grandi, UN High Commissioner for Refugees:
“I don’t think that the leadership in South Sudan and the opposition – I include government and opposition – are taking seriously the desperate situation of their own people in spite of the pressures; in spite of the fact that we brought refugees to the table of negotiation of the IGAD process to talk about their experiences. Still, their voice doesn’t seem to be heard. And I think that is pretty disappointing.”

FILE – SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2017, VARIOUS LOCATIONS, BANGLADESH

12. Aerial shot, Rohingya refugees in camp
13. Various shots, Rohingya refugees wading water

FILE – AUGUST 2017, ANGOLA

14. Various shots, Congolese refugees arriving in camp

FILE – AUGUST 2017, OFF THE COAST OF LIBYA

15. Tilt down, refugees boarding patrol vessel
16. Close up, refugee babies in boat

STORYLINE:

Wars, other violence and persecution drove worldwide forced displacement to a new high in 2017 for the fifth year in a row, according to United Nations refugee agency’s (UNHCR) annual Global Trends report, released today (19 Jun).

The report showed that 68.5 million people were displaced as of the end of 2017. Overwhelmingly it is developing countries that are most affected.

Refugees who have fled their countries to escape conflict and persecution accounted for 25.4 million of the 68.5 million. This is 2.9 million more than in 2016, also the biggest increase UNHCR has seen in a single year. Asylum-seekers, who were still awaiting the outcome of their claims to refugee status as of 31 December 2017, meanwhile rose by around 300,000 to 3.1 million. People displaced inside their own country accounted for 40 million of the total, slightly fewer than the 40.3 million in 2016.
In short, the world had almost as many forcibly displaced people in 2017 as the population of Thailand. Across all countries, one in every 110 persons is someone displaced.

United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees Filippo Grandi said the increase in numbers is due to “protracted conflicts, lack of solutions for those conflicts that continue, continuous pressure on civilians in countries of conflict that push them to leave their homes, and new or aggravating crises as well, like the Rohingya crisis, that of course accounts for quite a big increase in the number of refugees.”

Grandi underlined that 85 percent of that 68.5 million refugees is sheltering in poor or middle-income countries, which, according to Grandi should help dispel the perception that the refugee crisis “is a crisis of the rich world. It is not. It continues to be a crisis mostly of the poor world.”

The High Commissioner also pointed out that some seventy percent of refugees are nationals of only ten countries.

He said “that is significant because it means, frankly that if there were solutions to conflict fundamentally in those countries, or in some of them at least, that huge figure instead of rising every year could start going down.”

However, Grandi said “but we haven’t seen any significant progress in peace making or peacebuilding in any of those ten countries producing 70 percent of the global force displacement.”

Next to Rohingya and Syria refugee crisis, Grandi singled out the crisis in South Sudan.

He said, “I don’t think that the leadership in South Sudan and the opposition – I include government and opposition – are taking seriously the desperate situation of their own people in spite of the pressures; in spite of the fact that we brought refugees to the table of negotiation of the IGAD process to talk about their experiences. Still, their voice doesn’t seem to be heard. And I think that is pretty disappointing.”

UNHCR’s Global Trends report is released worldwide each year ahead of World Refugee Day (20th June) and tracks forced displacement based on data gathered by UNHCR, governments, and other partners. It does not examine the global asylum environment, which UNHCR reports on separately and which continued in 2017 to see incidents of forced returns, politicization and scapegoating of refugees, refugees being jailed or denied possibility to work, and several countries objecting even to use of the word “refugee”.

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